Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
Now as a parent of two teenagers, she’s made sure to raise her daughters to learn how to love and care for pets (and other animals) in the most responsible and loving ways. As a result, she and her daughters now have 5 rescued dogs and cats who essentially rule their home! Sally has also volunteered over the years to help raise funds for various animal nonprofit organizations.
Per the treat bag, King Kanine says that one cookie is equivalent to 3 ml of 150mg CBD oil. So, according to its dosage chart, King Kanine recommends a 75 lb dog be given 1 a treat per day for health and immunity support as well as for mild anxiety, nausea or vomiting and pain from injury, surgery, hip dysplasia, etc. The same weight dog can have up to 2 treats per day for severe pain, cancers and epilepsy. The dosage for your dog will depend on its size and the severity of the condition being treated or managed (dosage info is included on the back of the treat bag and it is per day).
CBD for pets is a topic that is being discussed more and more every day. I’ve done my fair share of research and came across a company called InTuneCBD. I think it’s important to understand and know the ingredients that are in these CBD treats and InTune offers just that! I ordered a free sample through their site and gave it to my furbaby Oliver who has severe separation anxiety and it’s worked wonders for him!

Yes l am so happy l found these articles. I have a 15 month old Yorky and my poor baby has a very sensitive stomach. In the past 4 months he had a lot of problems which in turn gave him never ending diarrhea. Well after being told to give him this, give him that, do not give him that. Well l finally made the choice to feed and make him homemade food. The food l have been cooking for him is butternut squash, sweet potato, carrots, broccoli and French style green beans. The meat that l add to his veggies is organic chicken. This is the best chicken l have ever tasted and cooked. After cooking it l store it in containers with some of the broth. This is so tender and moist, unbelievably great tasting and he loves it. The only thing l could not decide on was what kind of treats to make him. Well l have the Bake-A-Bone treat maker, with the doggy bone molds inside this machine. It’s just like a waffle maker but a doggy bone maker and your RECIPES came into play at the BEST TIME for my baby Jax. Thank you so so much and yes l do want your newsletter.

The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."


Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog.
Dog breeds are usually categorized by the functional type from which the breed was developed. The basic types are companion dogs, guard dogs, hunting dogs, herding dogs and working dogs. Breeds listed here may be traditional breeds with long histories as registered breeds, rare breeds with their own registries, or new breeds that may still be under development. In some cases, a breed's origin overlaps the boundaries of two or more countries; the dog is normally listed only in the country with which it is most commonly associated; for example, by its designated country according to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). Some dogs, such as the Löwchen, have an uncertain origin and are thus listed under several countries.

Clicker training, a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It's fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog
Pureed pumpkin (with no added sugar) is one of my favorite ingredients to use in dog treats. It’s nutritious for dogs — it’s high in fiber, low in fat,  and loaded with beta carotene, magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc and vitamins A and C. And the high fiber content in pumpkin can benefit your dog’s digestive track, which is why it’s often recommended for dogs with stomach issues such as diarrhea.
Dog treats serve a number of useful purposes. They help satisfy your dog’s need to chew, and they’re an indispensable part of training, especially for food-motivated pups. Crunchy dog biscuits and smaller treats can be given as dog training treats or everyday snacks to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Long-lasting dog treats are great for special occasions. They can help reduce stress as your dog chews or keep her occupied when guests visit. Every pup loves good natural dog bones or bully sticks, and naturally shed antlers for dogs will keep your dogs chewing happily for hours. Chewy also contains a wide range of dog treats including dental chews dog treats, soft dog treats, dog jerky treats, freeze dried dog treats, prescription dog treats, dehydrated dog treats and more. Treat-dispensing dog toys can add another layer of chewing fun. Get the best dog treats, pet food online at Chewy!
Pureed pumpkin (with no added sugar) is one of my favorite ingredients to use in dog treats. It’s nutritious for dogs — it’s high in fiber, low in fat,  and loaded with beta carotene, magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc and vitamins A and C. And the high fiber content in pumpkin can benefit your dog’s digestive track, which is why it’s often recommended for dogs with stomach issues such as diarrhea.
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; select Pet Pharmacy brands (Bravecto, Tri-Heart Plus, Optimmune, Vetsulin, Salix, Incurin, Mometamax, Panacur, Otomax & Orbax); WholeHearted Memberships, add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart. 
×