My dog is very anxious. I have a 12 yr old mini dachshund whose separation anxiety/frustration barking I’ve been battling for a few months. I’m moving to an apartment (currently in a duplex) in a few months and I’m terrified that I’ll get noise complaints. I’ve been talking to the vet and we might try a different medication to see if it’ll help. If anyone has more suggestions I’d love to hear them.
Pureed pumpkin (with no added sugar) is one of my favorite ingredients to use in dog treats. It’s nutritious for dogs — it’s high in fiber, low in fat,  and loaded with beta carotene, magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc and vitamins A and C. And the high fiber content in pumpkin can benefit your dog’s digestive track, which is why it’s often recommended for dogs with stomach issues such as diarrhea.

Some of these dog treats recipe use peanut butter, and for the most part that’s fine. However, there are a few brands of peanut butter that contain xylitol, an artificial sweetener that is extremely toxic to pets (it’s also found in many sugar free gums & candies). Small amounts of xylitol can be fatal to dogs, so please double check your peanut butter label to make sure it does not contain xylitol.
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion.

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Sit. Lay down. Roll over. Paw. Who’s a good girl? (Or, of course, boy!) These are common phrases uttered by dog owners around the world before their dogs favorite time of the day—treat time. While it’s common for dog owners to want to shower their dog with treats to keep them happy, you’ll want to make sure that you're choosing the best option for your pet. There’s a lot to consider when it comes to dog treats — does your dog like the treats, have any allergies or health conditions, and do the treats you choose support overall health needs of your pet? The dog treat market can be a bit difficult to navigate, so we’ve done the navigating for you.
Clicker training, a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It's fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog
Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog.
CBD for pets is a topic that is being discussed more and more every day. I’ve done my fair share of research and came across a company called InTuneCBD. I think it’s important to understand and know the ingredients that are in these CBD treats and InTune offers just that! I ordered a free sample through their site and gave it to my furbaby Oliver who has severe separation anxiety and it’s worked wonders for him!
The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.
Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:
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