There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion.
The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
On Wednesday last, in the Quean's Bench Division of the High Court, before Lord Coleridge and a special jury. Spratt's Patent Company claimed an injunction against a Mr. Warnett, a general dealer at St. Albans, who, they alleged, was selling as theirs certain meat biscuits for dogs not of their manufacture. They also asked for an account of profits, and damages and costs.
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
The consensus, however, is to play it safe and start with a very low dosage (3mg or lower). Stick with this regimen for a week or longer to see if you notice a difference in your dog. If he’s not showing improvements, then you can up the dosage — as long as your vet gives it a nod. Keep in mind that your dog’s weight is a major factor in how much of any supplement you should give. Learn more in our CBD Dosage Guide.
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!

Yes l am so happy l found these articles. I have a 15 month old Yorky and my poor baby has a very sensitive stomach. In the past 4 months he had a lot of problems which in turn gave him never ending diarrhea. Well after being told to give him this, give him that, do not give him that. Well l finally made the choice to feed and make him homemade food. The food l have been cooking for him is butternut squash, sweet potato, carrots, broccoli and French style green beans. The meat that l add to his veggies is organic chicken. This is the best chicken l have ever tasted and cooked. After cooking it l store it in containers with some of the broth. This is so tender and moist, unbelievably great tasting and he loves it. The only thing l could not decide on was what kind of treats to make him. Well l have the Bake-A-Bone treat maker, with the doggy bone molds inside this machine. It’s just like a waffle maker but a doggy bone maker and your RECIPES came into play at the BEST TIME for my baby Jax. Thank you so so much and yes l do want your newsletter.


My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.


Some of these dog treats recipe use peanut butter, and for the most part that’s fine. However, there are a few brands of peanut butter that contain xylitol, an artificial sweetener that is extremely toxic to pets (it’s also found in many sugar free gums & candies). Small amounts of xylitol can be fatal to dogs, so please double check your peanut butter label to make sure it does not contain xylitol.
The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.

my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening


Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”

There are no regulated dosage recommendations for CBD for dogs — or even humans — at this point. What’s more, there aren’t even any generally accepted guidelines about how much CBD for dogs is effective for certain conditions, even taking weight into consideration. So you’ll notice that each company can differ significantly in the amount of CBD in each treat and the number of treats they recommended. 
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