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It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.

Some of these dog treats recipe use peanut butter, and for the most part that’s fine. However, there are a few brands of peanut butter that contain xylitol, an artificial sweetener that is extremely toxic to pets (it’s also found in many sugar free gums & candies). Small amounts of xylitol can be fatal to dogs, so please double check your peanut butter label to make sure it does not contain xylitol.
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them.

If your dog exhibits a behavior you don’t like, there is a strong likelihood that it’s something that has been reinforced before. A great example is when your dog brings you a toy and barks to entice you to throw it. You throw the toy. Your dog has just learned that barking gets you to do what he wants. You say “no,” and he barks even more. Heaven forbid you give in and throw the toy now! Why? Because you will have taught him persistence pays off. Before you know it you’ll have a dog that barks and barks every time he wants something. The solution? Ignore his barking or ask him to do something for you (like “sit”) before you throw his toy.
I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.

Modified this recipe for my dog! He gets carsick so I wanted to make a “puppy dramamine” (everyone is very divided on whether you can give dogs ACTUAL dramamine so I figured I would play it safe). Subbed 1 of the tablespoons of pb for grated ginger, and for the water I used brewed chamomile tea. Also I forgot to buy cornmeal so I added another cup of whole wheat flower and it worked fine
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The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors--and few of us do because it's not recommended--you'll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog. Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training:
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion.
We tried the Blueberry version of this product (3 mg each) and the 150 mg CBD oil for free in exchange for an unbiased review. Our dog has advanced hip and back arthritis. While she loved the fish oil mixed with the CBD oil, she is an even bigger fan of the treats! It is also not as messy (the owner’s fingers smelled of fish oil after each dose of the oil) and a lot more fun to give a treat than to try to squirt a vial of oil into a dog’s mouth!
Yes l am so happy l found these articles. I have a 15 month old Yorky and my poor baby has a very sensitive stomach. In the past 4 months he had a lot of problems which in turn gave him never ending diarrhea. Well after being told to give him this, give him that, do not give him that. Well l finally made the choice to feed and make him homemade food. The food l have been cooking for him is butternut squash, sweet potato, carrots, broccoli and French style green beans. The meat that l add to his veggies is organic chicken. This is the best chicken l have ever tasted and cooked. After cooking it l store it in containers with some of the broth. This is so tender and moist, unbelievably great tasting and he loves it. The only thing l could not decide on was what kind of treats to make him. Well l have the Bake-A-Bone treat maker, with the doggy bone molds inside this machine. It’s just like a waffle maker but a doggy bone maker and your RECIPES came into play at the BEST TIME for my baby Jax. Thank you so so much and yes l do want your newsletter.
This is a MUST for anyone new to dog training, or anyone who has reached a plateau. Dog training should not be about domination, but communication. The latest installment of my "Dog Training 101" series is up, and it's a good one! Absolutely PACKED with entertaining dogs and great info. Y'all are going to like this one:) Believe it or not, I'll give you a quick lesson on how to teach your dog to leave something alone when you ask, look at you when you ask, sit, lie, down, tips on working with high energy dog, the importance of the training bubble, the value of clicker training, and of course how to achieve great communication with your dog!
The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.
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